Tag Archives: web design

My website is launched

If you haven’t seen it yet, RosieWalunas.com is launched.

This is RosieWalunas.com!

I took a web design for journalists class this past semester, and, the final product was a portfolio website.

My website displays my production work, resume, and some photography and articles. I also link to my Vimeo, Flickr, Twitter, and blog.

Since I’m still new to web design, I there’s much more for me to learn and explore, but I am proud of myself for making it this far.

More to come, of course.

Enjoy.

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Flash graphics assignment

The following is an assignment for a journalism class at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

The best instance of my integrating Flash into my portfolio website would be to do displaying my photography.

I would like the Photography page to display my photos. Users can click on words such as ‘nature,’ ‘people,’ and ‘places.’ A photograph would appear, and sub buttons would appear below the subject buttons. Then visitors can click on the sub buttons, such as ‘Lithuania’ and photos taken in Lithuania would appear.

Flash would enhance the photography page by allowing more room for aesthetics, while HTML and CSS would be much more difficult to manipulate in such ways. Most of my photos are uploaded to Flickr. Using Flash will allow me to feature specific photos. Also, if I have natural sounds sounds that may fit with some photos, Flash enables web developers to apply those sounds, such as in a button.

"Macbeth" at The Globe, London.

I already have the photos. I would make the text and basic graphics in Flash. If I decided to add natural sounds to the photos, I would have to go into some of my videos taken at the time and get sounds from those videos. I probably don’t have audio for every photograph, but it’s something that would be interesting to experiment with (I hope it wouldn’t be annoying).

I currently know how to make buttons and add sounds that would fit perfectly. I would like to better learn how to program the buttons with a motion graphic. I can do both individually, but I am still learning how to program the concepts together.


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Where I’ve been…

Obvious: I have not posted a proper blog entry or update since September.

Reason: I have been taking five classes and working two jobs.

Details: I’ve been taking some some interesting classes at UMass Amherst, such as web design for journalists, investigative journalism, and a film workshop at Hampshire College. 

I’m learning web design and building a portfolio website in a web design class, taught by Brian McDermott, which I will publish at the end of the semester. That’s a huge step up from this blog, which I’m excited about. The website will creatively display my work and resume. I’ve been using and learning Dreamweaver as well as Flash to build my website up from scratch. I haven’t used a single template, which has proven to be a great learning experience. I will provide more details about my website when it’s published.

The film workshop, taught by Abraham Ravett, at Hampshire College is pretty awesome. It’s been a difficult transition from working digital to working analog, but because I have such a solid grasp in camera fundamentals like film speed, aperture, frame rate, and shutter speed, I’ve definitely had an easier time than some of my fellow classmates. The class requires students to work in 16mm black and white reversal film shot on a Bolex and edit projects on a Steen Beck. I’ve transfered pretty much all of my footage to video, but the transfers aren’t that great, which is kind of disappointing considering how beautiful film looks projected as opposed to scan lines and pixels. I’m still working on editing my most recent shorts in Final Cut Pro, which I will likely upload at the end of the semester.

The investigative journalism course, taught by Steve Fox, has taken up most of my time and has been a challenging learning experience. We are investigating and reporting on the Phoebe Prince bullying case and its aftermath. The UMass journalism class is partnered with MassLive.com, so everything we produce gets published on the site. Our articles are published on a blog page which can be found at masslive.com/bullying. My beat is covering the South Hadley School Committee and related matters. My final project for this semester will be a video, which I will link to when it debuts.

Work has been keeping me busy editing various wildlife videos. I’ve recently edited videos on swamp pink, bog turtles, and puffins. They will debut at a biologists conference in February; I am uncertain if they will be published online.

This semester has been far too busy, but it will all be worth it come mid-December. As a prelude to next semester (my last and final semester of college), I hope I will be able to update much more frequently as well as have more time to play around with After Effects, cameras, and documentary work – oh and looking for a job.

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A well-designed journalism website

This is part two of an a assignment for my Web Design for Journalists class at UMass.

Part one of this post involved me searching for a “terribly designed website” and point out what makes it so poorly designed. 

Part two of this assignment requires me to find a well-designed journalism website and make a post about why I like it.

But, as if you couldn’t see this one coming, I have loyally chosen PBS Frontline‘s website.

An aesthetically pleasing example of a well-designed media site.

The Frontline website is aesthetically pleasing, complex yet easy to navigate, and exudes an experience for the user. Here’s how:

  • The colors work. Note the varying shades of blue, gray, and purple. And, what pops out is the copany’s logo, which is classically white on red.
  • The shapes are spot on. Rectangles and squares follow continuous patterns, are spaced fairly, and are lined up like city buildings and skyscrapers.
  • Episodes are featured in two formats, as well as through the program schedule which is clearly marked.
  • Links to a popular topics and current affairs section is also clearly featured and is updated fairly regularly.
  • The user experience is first exemplified by a savvy theme. When users move their mouse over a featured program, an opaque detail card pops up, giving the viewer more information.
  • The front page also features a slick flip-book like rectangle showing off popular episodes.
  • When viewers click around the main menu they are taken to slightly less complicated sub-pages that aren’t necessarily less exciting but are clear and concise – and, yes, aesthetically pleasing.
  • The font and words are easy to read.
  • Their organization is key to helping fans find the shows they love most.
  • The screen fits to the window when it is expanded by a user.
  • Only one scroll bar is necessary.

It’s hip, it’s cool, it’s professional and is accessible.

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