Tag Archives: t1i

Photos of the Days – Here, There, Nearly Everywhere

July 16, 2010

Smith College.

 

July 17, 2010

Old Sturbridge Village

 

July 18, 2010

Neutral Density - like sunglasses for your camera.

July 19, 2010

Well, unfortunately I have made it this far, and on this day I failed to take a photo. But, I’m someone who keeps on trucking. So as much as I would like to quit this now arduous project, I am going to keep going.

July 20, 2010

One of my favorite photo's from Petit Manan Island, Maine.

July 21, 2010

There's always something special about a sunrise.

 

July 22, 2010

Garden stripes.

 

July 23, 2010

Brother sanding down the wood.

 

July 24, 2010

Blueberries. Unfortunately, it wasn't a great season.

 

July 25, 2010

Corn tops against some dramatic clouds.

 

July 26, 2010

Dad.

 

July 27, 2010

Brother's cookies.

July 28, 2010

Editing the heck out of a photograph.

 

July 29, 2010

This probably belongs to someone named Allis... (?)

 

July 30, 2010

Not my baby, but still so cute.

 

July 31, 2010

Sean rock climbing.

 

August 1, 2010

Flowers like clouds.

 

August 2, 2010

Sandy Point Island in Connecticut and Rhode Island is managed in part by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; which was my reason for getting out to the island.

 

August 3, 2010

Delicious apricot jam.

 

August 4, 2010

If only I had a longer lens to capture these mushrooms.

 

August 5, 2010

Smores at Katy's.

 

August 6, 2010

Yet another picture of my baby (sorry I just can't help myself, especially after a long day of work).

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The Rain Drop Advantage

Usually when it rains, me and every other photographer it seems takes photos of the rain drops as the subject matter. Not wanting to make this cliché photo mistake, something sparked inside of me to use the rain drops as a texturing tool rather than the subject matter.

No background bokeh for these rain drops.

I was sitting at my family’s computer, which involves a lot of waiting due to our dial-up connection. the sun was setting and I turned to the window in which it leaked in and hit me in the face.

In one window pane, remarkably, the pane that the sun rays were shining through was covered in glistening rain drops. Then, the spark came! Photo of the day!

But, of course, I had to get this classic shot.

Ran to get my camera, threw the rain drops out of focus, the fence in focus, and snapped away.

This further inspired me to go outside and take more photographs while my email waited to load, thus, today, I bring you a new, beautiful, and hopefully not cliché photo slideshow.

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On A Hill

May 23, 2010

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill

I often walk this hill.

I imagine when my great grandparents and my grandmother and her siblings finally settled at the foot of this immense mound, they had already looked up at its greatness for several years.

I imagine them, maybe, walking about the hill, maybe, taking a break from farming the land. And, really, I can only imagine them looking over the valley and seeing woods covering Sunderland, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, Easthampton, and beyond, that little more exist.

Sun setting and rain a few miles away.

 

I imagine my mom riding her horse around this hill, young like me. That’s what I imagine her doing here.

When I look from the top of this hill, I see the farm, still in the family; my parents’ work hard for a life I’m not sure I will take on.

I see the University of Massachusetts, treetops, crevasses where there are major roads, and mountains I believe exist in the works of Erastis sailsburyfield.

So many times I have walked up this hill – with neighbors, family, friends, horses, dogs, boyfriends, Sean.

Mostly, I feel, it’s the one thing here that isn’t stale.

Clover.

When I was young, a real child, and the hill was covered in snow, just so the grass couldn’t poke through, I would walk alone making footprints with intensions, walking backwards.

If the snow melted in the sun and hardened into a half inch of crust at night, we would all scurry our way up the hill, and slide down, and dive off whatever our vehicle was before hitting pickers at the bottom.

When the snow was light, we would hitch up the horse to the sleigh and ride up and around on sunny days.

When there was no snow, no mud from the spring thaw, and the grass was short, we’d ride the horses around there too. I think my earliest memories of being on the hill is of my parents shifting me on and off the front of the saddle; one of them always holding me around my tummy.

That might have been before they rented the field out, but I don’t really know.

One renter planted cow corn. The neighbors and I would run through the isles of tall stalks, getting whipped by long fuzzed leaves.

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill.

Later on, we got a new renter, who does hay. It was always fun to climb the gold bails, to try and push them around. We were all too weak and young. I’m pretty sure we all loved the smell, of the dried grass warming in the sun. The dust would tickle our noses.

Before we were of age, we learned how to drive out there. Before grandma died, when I was practicing how to drive, we put her in the car too. She liked going for rides. She told me to put the pedal to the metal, of course I didn’t. I always think about that when I’m driving and I think of grandma.

I was real sad then, when I was in high school. I did a lot of imagining. I would always imagine romantic affairs up there. Who wouldn’t want to be up the hill, seeing everywhere, so far, with someone you love who loves you back? But I was mostly alone then.

So, sometimes I would take the dog up there – just the two of us. She was really my mom’s dog, and I could never have loved her as much, but it made me happy to see the dog prancing through grass three feet high or snow three feet deep. Then we’d have to pick the tics off her, or melt away the beads of snow caught in her paws. Once she bit a porcupine up there and it took days to get the quills out. That was a long night.

Fallen and dried.

Mostly we go up there at night anyways, I mean, when the sun is setting, at the end of the day. Sometimes, we all would walk up there and see UMass lit up at night. It was even easier to see the stars, the Milky Way, the moon.

Today, I walked up there with my camera. It’s a good camera. I can take some pretty good photos. The grass was mixed in with clover. The hill is passed spring, so there is no mud and the anthills are underway. It’s not ready for hay, hasn’t even been planted. Actually, I don’t know if it will. But I have to walk carefully, like my parents would always tell me, not to tramp all over the clover and grass. So, I walked carefully, trying not to trample all over the hill. I took some pictures. And, really, what I thought this time is, man, it’s going to be hard to leave this, one day.

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill

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Photo of the Day – Grains of Grass

May 23, 2010

Yesterday, I decided to be a real photographer, use a tripod, and get some bokeh.

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Dakota Jeane Music Video

While in London, I wanted to film  a music video of sorts. I discovered a singer-songwriter, Dakota Jeane, also on my program. I took it upon myself to make a small music video. It was shot in about three hours around London.

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Panoramic Tour of London

Last week I took a bus tour of London to see some sites, and this is what came out of it. Music is by fyrii. Shot on a Canon T1i. Edited with Final Cut Pro.

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Photo of the Day

January 4, 2010

This photograph was shot on a Canon T1i. The aperture was set to 8 and the shutter was open for about 25 seconds. 

Can you see Orion? He's smack dab in the middle of the telephone wires.

Can you see Orion? He's smack dab in the middle of the telephone wires.

 

And there's Seanie out there in the snow.

It would be helpful if anyone had any tips on reducing grain and making the stars appear more clear. It’s difficult when you look through the lens and all you see is black.

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