Tag Archives: farms

Photos of the Days – A Tremendous Lot

The last few weeks have been filled with business, as one can assume. I’ve been working and interning and enjoying the weekends fully.

My place of work sent me to do some shooting on Martha’s Vineyard. I had a great time and got a good sense of the island – that is a less stereotyped version of what I was expecting. It’s not all rich people is what I mean. Also, it’s probably one of the most beautiful beach/town areas I’ve ever been to. There are lots of farms and cute beaches, beautiful stone walls, fields, light woods, and small businesses. And the ferry ride was relaxing.

At my internship, I moved up from transcribing audio files, to checking audio files, to also writing grants in my spare time, and (get ready, hear it comes) all the way up to script syncing footage to the transcripts. Basically what that means, is I get to sit at the Avid and sync the recorded footage for the documentary up with transcriptions of the corresponding footage. It’s a bit of a tedious task, but I’ve already learned something new, which I don’t have the opportunity to do, and it’s a good skill.

Stay tuned, Maine puffin action is coming soon…

June 29, 2010

Garden sun.

June 30, 2010

 

Field sun.

July 1, 2010

Yes, that's a puppy holding a stuffed bunny.

July 2, 2010

Lilly with an aperture of 1.8, yes.

July 3, 2010

Cow affection in Hadley, Massachusetts.

July 4, 2010

This was once a nest with birds.

July 5, 2010

All the gear I had to carry to Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

July 6, 2010

Clay Gay Head cliffs on Martha's Vineyard.

July 7, 2010

Probably the hottest apartment in Northampton, Massachusetts.

July 8, 2010

Probably one of the best pictures I've taken of my friend's puppies.

July 9, 2010

Casino signage.

July 10, 2010

Thai pizza.

July 11, 2010

Garlic top.

July 12, 2010

Milkweed.

July 13, 2010

11 years, going strong.

July 14, 2010

Really, this was boring.

July 15, 2010

Honestly, the balloon just floated right over to us.

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On A Hill

May 23, 2010

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill

I often walk this hill.

I imagine when my great grandparents and my grandmother and her siblings finally settled at the foot of this immense mound, they had already looked up at its greatness for several years.

I imagine them, maybe, walking about the hill, maybe, taking a break from farming the land. And, really, I can only imagine them looking over the valley and seeing woods covering Sunderland, Amherst, Hadley, Northampton, Easthampton, and beyond, that little more exist.

Sun setting and rain a few miles away.

 

I imagine my mom riding her horse around this hill, young like me. That’s what I imagine her doing here.

When I look from the top of this hill, I see the farm, still in the family; my parents’ work hard for a life I’m not sure I will take on.

I see the University of Massachusetts, treetops, crevasses where there are major roads, and mountains I believe exist in the works of Erastis sailsburyfield.

So many times I have walked up this hill – with neighbors, family, friends, horses, dogs, boyfriends, Sean.

Mostly, I feel, it’s the one thing here that isn’t stale.

Clover.

When I was young, a real child, and the hill was covered in snow, just so the grass couldn’t poke through, I would walk alone making footprints with intensions, walking backwards.

If the snow melted in the sun and hardened into a half inch of crust at night, we would all scurry our way up the hill, and slide down, and dive off whatever our vehicle was before hitting pickers at the bottom.

When the snow was light, we would hitch up the horse to the sleigh and ride up and around on sunny days.

When there was no snow, no mud from the spring thaw, and the grass was short, we’d ride the horses around there too. I think my earliest memories of being on the hill is of my parents shifting me on and off the front of the saddle; one of them always holding me around my tummy.

That might have been before they rented the field out, but I don’t really know.

One renter planted cow corn. The neighbors and I would run through the isles of tall stalks, getting whipped by long fuzzed leaves.

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill.

Later on, we got a new renter, who does hay. It was always fun to climb the gold bails, to try and push them around. We were all too weak and young. I’m pretty sure we all loved the smell, of the dried grass warming in the sun. The dust would tickle our noses.

Before we were of age, we learned how to drive out there. Before grandma died, when I was practicing how to drive, we put her in the car too. She liked going for rides. She told me to put the pedal to the metal, of course I didn’t. I always think about that when I’m driving and I think of grandma.

I was real sad then, when I was in high school. I did a lot of imagining. I would always imagine romantic affairs up there. Who wouldn’t want to be up the hill, seeing everywhere, so far, with someone you love who loves you back? But I was mostly alone then.

So, sometimes I would take the dog up there – just the two of us. She was really my mom’s dog, and I could never have loved her as much, but it made me happy to see the dog prancing through grass three feet high or snow three feet deep. Then we’d have to pick the tics off her, or melt away the beads of snow caught in her paws. Once she bit a porcupine up there and it took days to get the quills out. That was a long night.

Fallen and dried.

Mostly we go up there at night anyways, I mean, when the sun is setting, at the end of the day. Sometimes, we all would walk up there and see UMass lit up at night. It was even easier to see the stars, the Milky Way, the moon.

Today, I walked up there with my camera. It’s a good camera. I can take some pretty good photos. The grass was mixed in with clover. The hill is passed spring, so there is no mud and the anthills are underway. It’s not ready for hay, hasn’t even been planted. Actually, I don’t know if it will. But I have to walk carefully, like my parents would always tell me, not to tramp all over the clover and grass. So, I walked carefully, trying not to trample all over the hill. I took some pictures. And, really, what I thought this time is, man, it’s going to be hard to leave this, one day.

Click to play a slideshow of On A Hill

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Shingle the Roof

I was walking around Amherst today and decided to stroll through the Amherst farmer’s market.

I, unexpectedly, saw this folk-countra trio playing some good traditional style string music.

They are called Shingle the Roof.

Playing for a gathering crowd.

New England based, Shingle the Roof has a whole list of shows to come, according to their MySpace page, and consists of Kate Spencer, Tim Woodbridge, and Jerry Devonkaitis.

Taking tips in a good ol' gas jug.

The band’s story is feature on their MySpace page, but what is the most ironic thing for me, is that the stringed instruments store, Maple Leaf Music, that Spencer opened in 1979 was the shop my first real guitar came from.

Pretty neat!

I went to the shop with my mom when I was 13, picked out a guitar I hardly new how to play, and from the moment on, the next five years of my life were set. I wrote music, took lessons, formed a band, played in a duo, and played shows at every chance I got.

While my music career dwindled when I took on my degree in journalism and this career in film, my playing turned into a source for music soundtracks for my videos and documentaries.

I don’t talk about playing music or anything much these days, but it’s something that definitely changed my life, and learning about Shingle the Roof was quite the surprise today.

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Mount Sugarloaf

Friday was a bit hazy for taking photos at the top of Mount Sugarloaf, but I snapped a good one of a tractor at teh mountain’s base.

Overlooking the Connecticut River.

 

Tractor hiding at the corner of a field and the base of the mountain.

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